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Blogs by Center for Exoplanet & Habitable World Members

Habitable Zone Planet Finder Team

  • The Camera of HPF
    Introduction: Spectrometer Cameras A spectrometer, as the name implies, records a ‘spectrum’ of an object. This spectrum, in its most basic form, is just a series of images of the instrument entrance aperture (whether it be a star, slit, optical … Continue reading →
  • Stellar Activity in the Near-Infrared: We Need a New Ruler!
    Introduction We talk about stellar activity a lot on this blog.  Once HPF gets on sky, radial velocity noise from stellar activity will likely be the biggest impediment to finding exoplanets.  Thus, if we want HPF’s chief scientific mission of … Continue reading →
  • The Plot Thickens: Habitable-Zone Exoplanets around Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1
    Introduction As the time approaches to commission HPF on the Hobby-Eberly Telescope, we are learning that the spectrograph will be coming online in truly exciting times for exoplanet science!  The detection of habitable-zone exoplanets around two nearby M dwarf stars—including … Continue reading →
  • NEID, HPF’s sister spectrograph
    Recently, the HPF team was selected to build the NEID spectrograph, the next generation spectrograph for the 3.5m WIYN telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, located on the Tohono O’odham reservation in Arizona. The word neid means ‘to see’ in the language of the Tohono … Continue reading →
  • The HPF cryostat test drive: sub-milliKelvin temperature stability
    Background: the need to cool HPF down to 180K One of the most frequently discussed topics on this blog has been the need to enclose the HPF instrument in a stable, cold environment.  Because HPF will observe stars in infrared … Continue reading →

NEID Spectrograph Team

  • Under Construction Already!
    It has been a busy summer for NEID and its team.  Now that the project has officially started, there are many tasks that must be done in a short amount of time.  Plans must be made, parts must be ordered, … Continue reading →
  • NEID Featured on the Many Worlds Blog
    As part of NASA’s Nexus for Exoplanet Systems Science (NExSS), science journalist Marc Kaufman documents new and interesting research related to NASA’s various exoplanet science programs on the Many Worlds blog.  His latest post features NEID, and its role in … Continue reading →
  • NEID: The Introduction
    Welcome to NEID!  Here, we will document the development and deployment of a new high resolution planet-finding spectrograph that will be installed in 2019 on the 3.5-meter WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, Arizona. This instrument will … Continue reading →

Jason Wright: AstroWright

  • Star-Planet Interactions, and Jupiter Analogs
    Waaaaay back in 2015 the International Astronomical Union held its General Assembly in Honolulu. I went and gave a review talk on star-planet interactions at a Focus Meeting. One nice thing (in the long run) about these Focus Meetings is that they generate proceedings that get published. It’s sort of old-fashioned now, but it’s still […]
  • Tabby doing a Q&A on the WTF star on Twitter
    Tabby just did a 20-questions-and-answers thing on Twitter.  I found it hard to read the whole thread, so I’ve compiled it here.  Enjoy! @lsu @Kervanderv A1: The dip lasted 5 days but now we're back to normal. #TabbysStar — Tabetha Boyajian (@tsboyajian) May 26, 2017 @lsu @Bharat_J25 A2: This is the latest light curve up […]
  • Two New Tabby’s Star Papers
    Amidst the huge task of collating all of the data coming in from the May 20, 2017 dip, two papers have hit the arXiv.  I don’t have any updates on the data from the dip (we haven’t had time to do any detailed analyses yet), but the live chat I did on Friday is still […]
  • Activity from calcium
    The atmosphere of the Sun (and other stars) contains calcium. It contains most of the elements, actually, just like the Earth does. As light that emerges from the sun passes through this cooler atmospher, two specific colors of very blue light, corresponding to specific transitions of electrons in a calcium ion, have a hard time getting […]
  • Who Should Be an Author on a Paper? V: Some Errata
    It looks like my post was based on the old AAS Ethics Statement, not the more recent Code of Ethics.  That’s fine, but it means the language I quoted was not the latest.  The language on who should be an author is the same, so the heart of my posts are unchanged. But now, the […]

Steinn Sigurdsson: Dynamics of Cats

Kimberly Cartier: AstroLady 

  • On the Road to a PhD: Houston, we have a defense date!
    This blog post is part of a series I’m writing along the road to my dissertation. These posts represent my personal experiences centered around getting a PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and all views expressed within are my own. This is my story. It’s official. The cats have been herded, the votes have been tallied, […]
  • On the Road to a PhD: Thesis Committee Meetings
    This blog post is part of a series I’m writing along the road to my dissertation. These posts represent my personal experiences centered around getting a PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and all views expressed within are my own. This is my story. So, there’s a really important part of getting a PhD that I […]
  • On the Road to a PhD: I won…an award?
    This blog post is part of a series I’m writing along the road to my dissertation. These posts represent my personal experiences centered around getting a PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and all views expressed within are my own. This is my story. So…I guess I won an award. Huh. Cool! Back at the AAS229 […]
  • On the Road to a PhD: Graduation timeline…yikes!
    This blog post is part of a series I’m writing along the road to my dissertation. These posts represent my personal experiences centered around getting a PhD in Astronomy & Astrophysics, and all views expressed within are my own. This is my story. So, I’ve known that I intended to graduate at the end of […]
  • On the Road to a PhD Blog Series
    Hello all! Thanks for joining me on my Road to a PhD…where I blog in semi-real time about the different stages I’m going through now that I’m officially cleared to graduate this year. It’s a lot like the stages of grief only not as grim and with a (hopefully) happy ending. Anyways, here’s a look […]

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